Liz Spring

Harwinton Consolidated School
Art Page



Ms. Liz Spring

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Hello: My name is Liz Spring and I am the art teacher at Harwinton Consolidated School. I have
taught art in Region 10 for more than 15 years.
   I believe that children have an inherent ability for creating art. Embracing that belief, I look
at my students and myself as lifelong learners. I plan meaningful art experiences that
connect to the learning students are doing in their classrooms, as well as historical and
cultural events.  
     Art is one of the most important ways people tell us how they view the world.  To be here
in this world, at this place and time, can be explored through the works of artists of all ages.
       Creating art gives a child the unique ability to explore without the fear of failure. Each
 lesson I teach, either new or honed through years of teaching, allows students to learn 
through doing. In my room, students have the opportunity to make mistakes and problem
solve,  In this way, art lessons can be not only successful, but relevant. Art education 
encourages the ability to value oneself and others, and to approach the world with a desire
to understand. 
     As a teacher, I consider myself an enthusiastic facilitator to the students' critical thinking
 and creating.
    Through inquiry, students learn to investigate, question, and critique art. In my class, I
 want to invite risk-taking in art making and creating.Ideally, art should be connected to other
subjects. With interdisciplinary studies and collaboration between teachers, students can
explore the concept of a cohesive community.
     The arts are the perfect vehicle for integration with literature, history, the environment,
 and much more.

     In the immortal words of Alexandra Trenfor:
"The best teachers are those who show you where to look, but don't tell you what to see."

      In my art room I spend a great deal of time showing children where to look. 




 

Art Teaching Philosophy Statement

Children have an inherent ability for creating art. I look at the child's concerns, their
creative play and imaginative collections, to make art lessons child-centered. Art is one of the
most important ways people tell us how they view the world. What it means to be here in this
world, at this place and time, may be explored through the works of artists of all ages. Children's
natural aptitude can be lost when art teachers impose only adult-centered concepts and artworks.
Art education should initially focus on children's ideas because their experiences must be valued
and built upon. In this way, art lessons can be not only successful, but relevant. Art education
encourages the ability to value oneself and others, and to approach the world with a desire to
understand.

As a teacher, I realize that before I teach a subject, I teach who I am- just by the fact of
my presence. Therefore I must be aware of how I think of myself and how I represent myself. I
do not wish to be viewed as an art expert, or a person who definitively knows if an artwork is
good or significant. Instead, I am a skilled and enthusiastic facilitator to the students' critical
thinking and creating.

Exploring the contribution of diverse artists to the world community opens children's
beliefs and encourages pride in being an artist. Art should be studied and made for both its
expressive power and its possible social meaning. Art is a language of thought which must be
accessible to all students, not just the talented or well-connected few. It is essential for teachers
and artists (including student-artists) to work together to explore their own stories and dislodge
the ideologies that sustain the practice of exclusion and marginalization. This can be achieved
through critical multicultural art education. Teaching non-Western art, European art, and
contemporary art is important because, in some way, it is part of everyone's story and survival.
One story is needed to balance the other.

Through a community of inquiry, students learn to investigate, question, and judge art
(including challenging my own ideas). In my class, I want to invite risk-taking in art making and
art thinking that questions the status quo and searches for personal or social truths. Ideally, art
should be connected to other academic disciplines. With interdisciplinary studies and
collaboration between teachers, students can explore the concept of a cohesive community
interweaving the arts with literature, history, the environment, and much more.

Art Teaching Philosophy Statement

Children have an inherent ability for creating art. I look at the child's concerns, their
creative play and imaginative collections, to make art lessons child-centered. Art is one of the
most important ways people tell us how they view the world. What it means to be here in this
world, at this place and time, may be explored through the works of artists of all ages. Children's
natural aptitude can be lost when art teachers impose only adult-centered concepts and artworks.
Art education should initially focus on children's ideas because their experiences must be valued
and built upon. In this way, art lessons can be not only successful, but relevant. Art education
encourages the ability to value oneself and others, and to approach the world with a desire to
understand.

As a teacher, I realize that before I teach a subject, I teach who I am- just by the fact of
my presence. Therefore I must be aware of how I think of myself and how I represent myself. I
do not wish to be viewed as an art expert, or a person who definitively knows if an artwork is
good or significant. Instead, I am a skilled and enthusiastic facilitator to the students' critical
thinking and creating.

Exploring the contribution of diverse artists to the world community opens children's
beliefs and encourages pride in being an artist. Art should be studied and made for both its
expressive power and its possible social meaning. Art is a language of thought which must be
accessible to all students, not just the talented or well-connected few. It is essential for teachers
and artists (including student-artists) to work together to explore their own stories and dislodge
the ideologies that sustain the practice of exclusion and marginalization. This can be achieved
through critical multicultural art education. Teaching non-Western art, European art, and
contemporary art is important because, in some way, it is part of everyone's story and survival.
One story is needed to balance the other.

Through a community of inquiry, students learn to investigate, question, and judge art
(including challenging my own ideas). In my class, I want to invite risk-taking in art making and
art thinking that questions the status quo and searches for personal or social truths. Ideally, art
should be connected to other academic disciplines. With interdisciplinary studies and
collaboration between teachers, students can explore the concept of a cohesive community
interweaving the arts with literature, history, the environment, and much more.